Seneca Falls Convention

We are celebrating the 100th anniversary (1920-2020) of Women gaining the Right to Vote. Posts throughout the month will honor and tell some of the stories of events and the women who fought so long and so hard for women’s suffrage.

The Seneca Falls Convention (July 19, 1848)
72 years before the passage of the 19th Amendment.

The Seneca Falls Convention billed as the first American women’s rights convention convened on July 19, 1848. The two-day event, held in Seneca Falls, NY was advertised on July 11, 1848, in the Seneca County Courier.

Despite minimal publicity, there were an estimated 300 attendees. Many attendees lived locally, as there were many abolitionists living in the area. Many women and men working in the anti-slavery movement eventually became a part of the struggle to obtain equal rights for women.

The convention was organized by Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Lucretia Mott, Jane Hunt, Mary Ann M’Clintock, and Martha Coffin Wright. The meeting included a lecture on law, a humorous presentation, and multiple discussions about the role of women in society. Stanton and the other organizers presented the Declaration of Sentiments and a list of resolutions, to be debated and modified before being put forward for signatures.

A heated debate sprang up regarding women's right to vote, with many – including Lucretia Mott – urging for its removal, but Frederick Douglass, who was the convention's sole African American attendee, argued for its inclusion, and the suffrage resolution was kept.

Elizabeth Cady Stanton, opened the convention with a speech on the convention’s goals and purpose: “We are assembled to protest against a form of government, existing without the consent of the governed—to declare our right to be free as man is free, to be represented in the government which we are taxed to support, to have such disgraceful laws as give man the power to chastise and imprison his wife, to take the wages which she earns, the property which she inherits, and, in case of separation, the children of her love…”

When preparing for our Back to Blue event A Celebration of Women's Suffrage, Barb Davis did a great deal of research on the women and men in the women's suffrage movement. We wanted to share the stories and thank Barb for her research, as we celebrate the 100th anniversary of the 19th Amendment.  


Celebrating 100th Anniversary of the 19th Amendment

We are celebrating the 100th anniversary (1920-2020) of Women gaining the Right to Vote. Posts throughout the month will honor and tell some of the stories of events and the women who fought so long and so hard for women’s suffrage.

Susan B. Anthony (1820-1906)

Susan B Anthony was an American social reformer and women's rights activist who played a pivotal role in the women's suffrage movement. Born into a Quaker family committed to social equality, she collected anti-slavery petitions at the age of 17.

In 1851, she met Elizabeth Cady Stanton, who became her lifelong friend and co-worker in social reform activities, primarily in the field of women's rights.

In 1863, they founded the Women's Loyal National League and conducted the largest petition drive in US history to that time, collecting nearly 400,000 signatures in support of the abolition of slavery.

In 1866, they initiated the American Equal Rights Association, which campaigned for equal rights for both women and African Americans.

In 1868, they began publishing a women's rights newspaper called The Revolution and in 1869, they founded the National Woman Suffrage Association.

In 1872, Anthony was arrested for voting in her hometown of Rochester, New York, and convicted in a widely publicized trial. She refused to pay the fine.

In 1878, Anthony & Stanton arranged for Congress to be presented with an amendment giving women the right to vote. Often called the Susan B. Anthony Amendment, it was ratified the 19th Amendment to the US Constitution in 1920.

When first campaigning for women's rights, Anthony was harshly ridiculed and accused of trying to destroy the institution of marriage. Public perception of her changed radically during her lifetime. Her 80th birthday was celebrated in the White House and she became the first female citizen depicted on U.S. coinage when her portrait appeared on the 1979 dollar coin. Women’s suffrage was her life’s work. She died 14 years before the 19th Amendment passed.

When preparing for our Back to Blue event, which was eventually canceled, Barb Davis did a great deal of research on the women and men in the women's suffrage movement. We wanted to share the stories and thank Barb for her research, as we celebrate the 100th anniversary of the 19th Amendment. 


July Monthly Meeting

We are really excited to welcome Attorney General candidate Elad Gross For Missouri as our special guest this month. Elad is a constitutional attorney. He served as an Assistant Attorney General until the end of 2016 and represented Missourians in courts throughout the state.

Since then, Elad has fought for better government in Missouri by investigating and suing a corrupt dark money organization trying to buy Missouri’s government. He won a landmark Sunshine Law decision against the current Attorney General and Governor to stop the government from hiding public records.

In addition, we'll talk about our plans for providing notary services the next several weeks, our new headquarters, the August 4th Primary and more.

See you Thursday, July 23rd at 7:00 pm, if you aren't on our mailing list, you can get the link by sending us a message from this page. 


ENDORSEMENT ALERT

The Cass County Democratic Central Committee voted unanimously to endorse Amendment 2 on the August 4, ballot.

Passing Amendment 2 will bring our tax dollars home that currently go to other states. "By bringing our tax dollars home, we can protect thousands of frontline healthcare jobs, help keep rural hospitals open, and deliver healthcare to Missourians who earn less than $18,000 a year. That includes thousands of veterans and their families, those nearing retirement, working women who don’t have access to preventive care, and other hardworking Missourians whose jobs don’t provide health insurance."

To learn more you can visit www.yeson2.org


August 4th Primary

PULL A DEMOCRATIC PARTY BALLOT
Check your voter registration - https://s1.sos.mo.gov/elections/voterlookup/

Help with registering to vote - Contact Cass County Democratic Party at cassdemocrats at gmail dot com or DM this page.

Request a mail-in or absentee ballot - https://www.sos.mo.gov/elections/goVoteMissouri/howtovote#mail

Find a notary for your absentee or mail-in ballot in Cass County - contact the Cass County Democratic Party at cassdemocrats at gmail dot com or DM this page

If you decide to vote in person

Find your polling location - https://www.casscounty.com/2210/County-ClerkElection-Authority

Acceptable forms of ID - https://www.sos.mo.gov/elections/goVoteMissouri/howtovote#forms

 


Neal Barnes for House District 56

Meet Neal

I was raised in Belton and graduated from Belton High School. My wife JoAnne and I have been married for 39 years and raised our three children in Belton. I spent many years coaching my children's baseball and softball teams in the Belton Athletic Association. After our children graduated and moved out we built a new house on our farm just north of Drexel. I spent 36 years in the construction industry as a union Ironworker in Local 10 during which time I worked as a superintendent running multi-million dollar projects such as The Federal Reserve, Nebraska Furniture Mart, Sprint World Headquarters, The USDA, and The Church of the Resurrection among others. After retirement, I spend my time raising cattle on my farm and have been helping my mother take care of the family cattle farm since my father's passing.
I began my service to my community when I was appointed to the Belton Pool Board. I lived by Memorial Park and watched as the pool ran into disrepair. After a bond issue to build a new pool failed I inquired as to what options were available to fix the existing pool. The Mayor at the time then asked me to serve on the Belton Pool Board to help oversee the reopening of the pool. I served there for a short time and was then nominated to serve on the City Planning and Zoning Commission where I served for another 8 years. I then ran for Alderman and was elected twice to the SW ward where I served all 6 years. During my time on the Planning and Zoning commission and Board of Alderman, we initiated the TIF district and hired an Economic Development Director which brought in new business and drove the Belton economy forward creating new jobs and revenue. We were also able to improve the city by building a new Fire Station, Police Station, Community Center, and renovating and widening North Scott and 58 Hwy. Through this experience, I have learned how the legislative process works and how to work together with differing viewpoints to reach a common goal. I believe this experience gives me a unique skill set to help repair the crumbling infrastructure of Missouri and to end the divisiveness in our state's political process.

Annette Turnbaugh for House District 37

Annette Turnbaugh is running for the Missouri House of Representatives in District 37 in 2020. Annette has been a Grandview Alderman in Ward 2 since 2010.

June Monthly Meeting

We are incredibly excited to announce our Special Guest for our June meeting, Mr. Yinka Faleti. Yinka Faleti is the Democratic Nominee for Missouri Secretary of State. Born in Lagos, Nigeria, he immigrated to the United States at the age of seven, arriving at John F. Kennedy Airport. Yinka’s story is one that is inspiring and truly an American dream come true.

We'll be announcing some volunteer opportunities, a MAJOR fundraising event and you'll get to know Yinka, so join us on June 25th!

Please join our mailing list to receive the Zoom meeting link at https://www.casscountydemocrats.com/join and we'll also post the link in our private Facebook group.


Raymond Kinney for Senate District 31

I’m Raymond Kinney, a proud resident of Raymore, father and humbled candidate for Missouri state senate. Throughout the long history of the United States and its democracy, we’ve moved our nation’s backbone ideal of “we the people” in and out of the foreground and broken it with a “win above all” attitude.

The freedoms, infrastructure, and transparency our great state citizens deserve is being muddled in between personal agendas and arm twisting. My goal is to bring those core values back to the government by staying in touch with my constituents.

Each of us has a unique perspective on policies and current issues, and those perspectives deserve to be heard. It shouldn’t matter if you spend your days in a college classroom or plowing fields, working the train tracks or running a small business — you deserve to be heard and to have a candidate who represents you.

I was born and raised in Cleveland, Missouri to James and Deanna Kinney. From a young age, I witnessed my parents’ civic-mindedness and strong involvement in our small community. This instilled a strong value in me to remain involved in my community in every way possible. I graduated Cass-Midway high school in 1980, then enlisted in the United States Navy and served honorably from 1980-1984. I was first assigned to the USS Lexington from 1980-1982 as an Airman and then aboard the USS Tarawa from 1982-1984 as an Intelligence Specialist. After an honorable discharge in 1984, I returned home to Missouri.

In 1990 I married my wife, Debra Kinney, and we have two incredible children, of whom I am very proud. Christopher is also a military veteran, having proudly served in the USAF, and JacqueLyn, who is currently studying medicine in New Jersey. We moved to Sweet Springs in 1996 to raise our children.

During our time in Sweet Springs, I served as Mayor from 1998 to 2013. When I took over as Mayor, our city council was in so much turmoil, we were making the papers in other states. Fights and arguments during city council meetings, personal agendas, and disorder ruling the day. During my tenure, we turned things around, and our council meetings became cordial, professional, and productive. Upon my leaving office, a great honor was bestowed upon me as the council voted June 28, 2013, as Raymond Kinney Day. We chose to move to Raymore in 2013, after our children graduated high school, to be closer to family and work.

In 1998 I began working for Allied Systems as a Union Car Hauler transporting Ford trucks out of the KC Ford Assembly Plant in Claycomo. During this time I learned what it meant to be a Union member. I’m thankful that it afforded me the ability to provide a comfortable living for my family.

Through the years I witnessed others who have not been so fortunate and have struggled to make ends meet. I realized that I was the beneficiary of the hard work and sacrifices made by people who came long before me. I want to return the favor and continue the fight for the workers that are coming behind me.

Between the lessons learned from my parents and my union job, I have learned that the job is not only about one person; it’s about fighting for yourself, your fellow man, and the ones who follow behind you.

To learn more about how you can help Raymond win this race go to www.raymondkinney31.com


Virtual May Meeting

It's still going to be a bit before we can all get together in person but, we miss seeing you, and let's face it, we've got work to do! It's never been more apparent or important to change the politicians in Missouri and this country. It's time to get busy!

Click the "Join Us" button at the top of this page and fill out your contact info we'll send links to the Zoom Meeting w/agenda to follow, we'll see you on the 28th!